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Archive for the ‘Events’ Category

Banner July 21, 1969

FloodingFifthandBroadway002

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Grandeur that was never to return

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Frozen Cumberland

Frozen Cumberland

It’s been a while since this has happened!
My Dad remembers driving a car across this!

Photo from Nashvillle Memories by University Of Tennessee Press

“shall never forget. .I had been uptown with my buddy going to the Krystal and having 2 hamburgers and a RC cola (15 cents) then a cowboy movie at the Rex (10 cents). . . Somebody had a model T on the ice as I walked over the Shelby St Bridge going to my Fatherland St. home. .I could’t resist so I walked on the ice. My father asked me if I had done such a foolish thing and of course I said no.The NASHVILLE BANNER the next afternoon had a picture of people walking on the ice. .guess who was in the foreground. . .I still feel that spanking! “-Jim Sloan from nashlinks.com


Here is a photo shared by David Lewis. Featured are brother and sister Charles
and Thelma Lewis in 1940. You can see the power plant and the Train Trestle in the background.
Apparently they spent some time playing in the snow and ice in Shelby Park.


January 1940 photo by Cecil Pearl Weems


January 1940 photo by Cecil Pearl Weems


January 1940 photo by Cecil Pearl Weems


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Flood of 1932


Eighth avenue north and Jo Johnson


White’s Creek Pike

Rising Cumberland Drives Hundreds From Homes ; Aid Pushed

North First Street

North First Street

Davidson street residents on their way to find new and unflooded homes

Davidson street residents on their way to find new and unflooded homes

32_flooding02

Eighth avenue north and Jackson residents moving their belongings before water reaches the house.

Eighth avenue north and Jackson residents moving their belongings before water reaches the house.

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East Nashville Fire



6th & Russel streets

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St. Patrick’s Day Snowstorm of 1892

Mark A. Rose
Meteorologist
National Weather Service
Old Hickory, Tennessee

The winter of 1891-92 was almost one with no snowfall. Through March 14, a mere 0.3 inches of snowfall had been measured in Nashville, and it appeared that winter was over.1,2 There had been several days early in March with temperatures in the 60’s, and the thermometer had climbed to 70 degrees on the 4th.2 Sometime on March 13, a strong cold front swept through the region, dunking Nashville’s high temperature from 65 degrees on the 13th to 40 degrees the next day.2 Then, on the 15th, Nashville received a 4.2-inch snowfall — the largest by far of the season thus far.2 Much of this snow likely melted the next day, as the temperature rose to 39 degrees, and it appeared that a warming trend was underway.2 But this was not to be the case.

On St. Patrick’s Day, March 17, Nashville received the largest snowfall in its history — 17 inches — a record which still stands today. The snow began around 6:00 p.m. the previous evening.3 Very little accumulated until after midnight.2 The snow continued into the afternoon.3

Said a Nashville Banner article, which appeared on page eight on the day of the snowstorm, There has been much complaining, but there is consolation in the fact that the same snow that makes walking disagreeable, is enriching the wheat, fertilizing the land, and holding back the fruit until danger of frost is past. Over these things the farmers rejoice.

Nashville’s street cars had been “snowed under,” and did not run.3 Suburban workers had to walk to town.3 Morning trains were delayed.3 And the “arteries of trade” were clogged.3 Mailmen didn’t leave the post office on their rounds until 10:00 a.m.3 Many letters weren’t delivered until late afternoon.4 A freight train from Chattanooga ran upon a freight engine, derailing two cars, at the Winton community (near Murfreesboro), and did not get in until noon.3 A passenger train from Memphis due at 7:00 a.m. did not arrived until 2:00 p.m.3 And members of the Ancient Order of Hibernians in America canceled their annual parade.4

The Nashville Banner that day contained the following anecdotes: In the city the snow seems to be taken good-naturedly. A real estate dealer on Union street has “For Sale” on a huge pile of snow in front of his door, and all about town the snowdrifts along the sidewalks are labeled with such legends as, “Keep Off the Grass,” “Don’t Pluck the Roses,” “The Sunny South,” “Beautiful Spring,” “Come Into the Garden, Maud,” “Mosquito Bars Made Cheap,” “Linen Dusters at Half Cost,” “In Memory of Dixie That is Froze,” and “Where Are the Violets You Promised?”

In addition, the following conversation took place over the Associated Press wire:

Memphis Operator – The snow here is four feet deep.
Cincinnati – You mean inches, don’t you?
Memphis – No, it is up to a man’s knee.

So the winter that almost wasn’t concluded with 21.8 inches of snowfall, and with 21.5 inches of that accumulating in a single month, March of 1892 remains the snowiest month in Nashville’s history.1 The record 17-inch snowfall has been challenged only once. On February 20-21, 1929, Nashville accumulated 15 inches of snow during a remarkable 13-hour period spanning two calendar days.5 The next largest snowfall on record is 9.8 inches, which occurred on February 3, 1886.5

__________

1 National Weather Service. Nashville Monthly Snowfall Table.

2 National Weather Service. Monthly Climate Summary for Nashville, Tennessee for March, 1892.

3 The Beautiful Snow. Nashville Banner. March 17, 1892.

4 O’Donnell, Red. Nashvillians made light of 16-inch snow in ’92. Nashville Banner. March 16, 1982.

5 National Weather Service. One-Day Snowfall Totals of at Least 6″ at Nashville.

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April 13, 1945 President Roosevelt dead

April 13, 1945 President Roosevelt dead

Click for larger view

April 13, 1945 Nashville Tennessean

Stroke Fatal to Roosevelt

Truman takes oath as 32nd U.S. President
Believed last picture of president
Warm springs death comes after fainting
New U.S. Chief
Wayne Taylor Heads Export-Import Bank
Washington shocked to foundations
weather

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